Trail Talk 126 July 8th 2020

A Spiketail Dragon fly
Northern Catalpa blossom

The work on the GART was stopped when it was realized that the part near the pond was known as a turtle nesting site.   Cristin Watt from Trent University got permission and collected 58 snapping turtle eggs for hatching, so thanks to all involved for this happy outcome.

On Thursday June 25th we saw a spiketail dragonfly on a cedar trunk, eating what appeared to be a moth. The Northern Catalpas are now in bloom as are the Michigan lilies. One plant at the Clinton Conservation area was unusual in having eight blossoms and two buds on a single plant

The tree that fell as I watched

I was working on an alternate to part of the reroute round the cottage. It is a North-South trail through Robertson Tract for about 700 m, as an alternative to going along the edge of the field for the whole reroute.  I was surprised to hear a noise close by , which I though was a person and turned round and watched a small dead tree with a lot of vines fall over across the trail about 8 feet away. Fortunately I had a chain saw with me so quickly removed it.  This is only the second time I have watched a tree fall over and on both occasions there was very little wind.

Red elderberries are now in fruit, and are usually found under a tree canopy.  They were traditionally harvested and processed for food by virtually all the Native American groups throughout the plant’s range in the Pacific Northwest.  However they can be toxic if not cooked properly, are full of seeds and today few people eat Red Elderberries on account of these properties and their slightly bitter-pungent flavor. Most people enjoy the purple black fruit of common elderberry which are found in the fall.

At Lobbs a chipmunk ran right across the trail very close to me , and later on a black squirrel did the same.  At Clinton Conservation area a ground hog ran close to me , and in all cases Chewy being nearly totally blind did not react.  With most other dogs there would have been three dead creatures.

Later on at the Conservation area I saw a white squirrel, only the second sighting there for both a white squirrel and ground hog.
Milkweed is now in blossom and Joe-Pye-weed will also be out soon.  From a distance they can look similar, but milkweed has two opposite more rounded leaves while Joe-Pye-weed has leaves in whirls of 3 or 4 for sweet Joe-Pye-weed and 4 or 5 for spotted Joe-Pye-weed which is the variety I have seen.

I believe the work on the GART has now been completed, so go out and enjoy the improved surface.

Notes

  Hikers are expected to be socially distant from others.

All area trails are expected to be open, except for the Maitland Trail between 9.6 and 10.2 km.

Lobbs may be closed sometime for logging.

The reroute round the cottage at 45.3 km has been completed and has added about an extra 2km to the Maitland Trail.

There are no scheduled Maitland Trail Association or Bayfield River Valley Association or LIFE hikes. The Tuesday Trompers have restarted as of June 23rd when there were nine hikers out .

If you have questions or something of interest for Trail Talk email me Patrick Capper at pcapper99@gmail.com.

 

The reroute round the cottage at 45.3 km has been completed and has added about an extra 2km to the Maitland Trail.

There are no scheduled Maitland Trail Association or Bayfield River Valley Association or LIFE hikes. The Tuesday Trompers have restarted as of June 23rd when there were nine hikers out and 13 on June 30th .

If you have questions or something of interest for Trail Talk email me Patrick Capper at pcapper99@gmail.com.